Timeline

1868

John Mackintosh was born on 7th July in the town of Dukinfield, Cheshire, moving to Halifax soon afterwards

1890

Marriage of Violet and John Mackintosh. Soon after they opened a small business in a rented shop at 53 King Cross Street

1892

Violet and John Mackintosh move from retail to wholesale selling in and production

1894

John Mackintosh Moves to a factory in Bond Street and into larger premises in Hope Street, Halifax

1895

The business moved to Hope Street under the name, the Steam Confectionary Works

1896

New flavours had joined his original culinary creation of toffee deluxe – including creamery toffee...

1898

The firm manufactures Christmas crackers

1899

J. Mackintosh Limited, a limited liability company, was established with a capital of £15,000. That year a new factory, Kingston Confectionary Works, was built on Queens Road; The business prospered and Mackintosh toffee was being exported to Italy, Spain and China

1900

Greystones, John and Violet Mackintosh’s home, was built c.1900 in the Arts and Crafts Style in a prominent position on the corner of Manor Heath Road and Queen's Gate, Savile Park, Halifax

1904

Mackintosh opened a factory in the United States. In 1909 the Queens Road factory was destroyed in a fire but rebuilt soon afterwards.

1905

Mackintosh's Toffee Company (America) Limited was recorded with registered office at Halifax

1906

In Germany Mackintosh's established a factory at Crefeld, near Cologne

1907

On Feb. 21st the S.S. Berlin was totally wrecked off the Hook of Holland John Mackintosh had crossed only the previous night. His foreman, who followed the next night, lost his life.

1909

On November 2nd the Queen's Road Factory was destroyed in a fire

1914

In the autumn a full-page advertisement was issued showing the Kaiser standing astride the maps of Belgium and France and staring with angry eyes across the Channel to the British Isles, on which rested a tin of "Mackintosh's Toffee." The title gives the explanation, "So that is what makes them fight so well"

1917

John Mackintosh sent a letter to the Editor of the newly named Halifax Courier on 21st September, 1917 appealing for help for prisoners of war.

1919

In June John Mackintosh gave a great "Victory Ball" to celebrate the return of most of his men from the Great War

1920

John Mackintosh died on 27th January. His funeral took place at Queens Road Church. His son Harold became chairman of the company.

1921

Heath Robinson, is commissioned for an advertising campaign.

1922

A laboratory was opened in Halifax

Harold Mackintosh was knighted when he was 31, one of the youngest ever people to be knighted for his work with Sunday schools

1925

The business of North Kerry Manufacturing Co. was purchased and NKM toffee introduced

1928

Harold Mackintosh was involved in the amalgamation of a group of Halifax building societies into the Halifax Building Society

1929

The company formed Anglo-American Chewing Gum Ltd

1930

Mackintosh acquired A.J. Caley and Son Ltd. in Norwich. The Caley company began in 1880 as a chemist’s shop

1931

Harold Mackintosh narrowly avoided merging the company with Rowntrees of York. Both companies already had a joint subsidiary in Ireland

1932

The Irish business of Mackintosh and Rowntree merge

1935

Harold Mackintosh was made a baronet

1936

Mackintosh's most famous creation Quality Street was produced in Halifax

1937

Rolo is launched in Halifax

1939

The Irish business of Mackintosh and Rowntree merged and reorganised as one company for the manufacture ofchewing gum led to the formation of Allied Confectionery Manufacturers Ltd

1942

During World War II, Mackintosh’s Norwich factory was destroyed by bombs, halting all production there

1946

Mackintosh’s was able to begin rebuilding its Norwich factory

1948

Harold Mackintosh became Lord Mackintosh of Halifax (a barony)

1950

The Quality Street brand was first exported to the United States

1951

In April, the company bought J & J Baldwin’s Bailey Hall mill which had originally been built by the Halifax Flour Society.

1956

Harold Mackintosh was Chairman of the National Savings Committee from 1943, becoming President in 1958. Under his leadership, National Savings introduced Premium Bonds

1957

Harold Mackintosh became Viscount Mackintosh of Halifax

Munchies were first introduced

1959

Caramac is first produced in Halifax

1963

Toffee Crisp and Tooty Frooties are launched in Halifax

1964

Mackintosh acquire the firm of Joseph Bellamy and Sons of Castleford, liquorice manufacturers

1965

Mackintosh acquire the firm of John Hill and Sons, biscuit makers

1966

Mackintosh acquire the firm of Gainsborough Craftsmen Ltd who design machines for the food processing industry.

1969

Mackintosh acquired the firm of Fox Glacier Mints Ltd.

The original shop in King Cross Street was demolished to make way for the new bypass

Mackintosh merged with Rowntree to become Rowntree Mackintosh Limited.

1971

The new Rowntree Mackintosh buy James Stedman Ltd. of Australia and the chocolate confectionery business of Chocolat-Menier S.A.

1972

An agreement was negotiated with Fujiyi Confectionery Company Ltd. to manufacture products for the Japanese market

1973

Rowntree Mackintosh acquired the Dutch Nuts Chocoladefabriek B.V.

1979

Rowntree Mackintosh acquired the Dutch Nuts Chocoladefabriek B.V.

1982

The parent company changed its name to Rowntree Mackintosh PLC

1986

It had added another 13 companies in the United Kingdom, France, Australia, the United States, and Canada. All of these acquisitions made a reorganization necessary

1987

The company incorporated four new trading subsidiaries in the United Kingdom: Rowntree Mackintosh Confectionery Ltd., Rowntree Mackintosh Distribution, Rowntree Mackintosh Export Ltd., and Rowntree Mackintosh European Exports Ltd

1988

Two Swiss companies, Nestlé and Jacobs Suchard, began a bidding war for Rowntree.